How Does Your Garden Grow?

Hello family, friends and fellow bloggers.  Hope everyone had a great weekend.

The beginning of the week here in Michigan is getting off to a hot and humid start….not complaining, I’ll take hot but maybe with  just a little less humidity.  I think today is going to be one of those days when I go outside just to check on my patio and porch planters and make sure the water in the water features has not evaporated and then stay inside where it’s cool.

Our garden is growing and doing well even with lack of rain.  Walt makes sure that everything gets watered regularly.  It’s nice to see that Joshua’s watermelon which got off to a slow start for some reason is now beginning to take off.  I just hope it produces something, our little guy has such high hopes.

Josh also planted corn which may turn out to be one of the few corn crops in Michigan this year.  He has about 24 stalks that have taken off and so long as we can keep the birds out of them hopefully this year he will be able to enjoy the rewards of his efforts.

I have mentioned in previous blogs that my dad grew up on a farm.  He has lots of stories about life on the farm, my favorites are the one about the haunted house and the other one is about a duck.  I’ll save those for another blog.

When I was a child, any time we traveled either up north to my grandparents cottage or even if it was a Sunday family drive to the country, my dad would always comment on the corn crops.  I grew up hearing “You know your corn is going to be ready if it’s knee-high by the fourth of July.”

It’s what I said to Walt the first time he tried to grow corn in our garden (until the squirles and birds helped themselves) and it stuck with him too.  So when Joshua asked how we would know if the corn was growing like it should Walt turned to him and said “Dzia Dzia says you’ll know your corn will be ready if it’s knee-high by the fourth of July.

Now anyone and everyone who knows Papa Walt knows that the man is never at a loss for words.  That was true until the day we were in the garden in the middle of June and Papa made that statement to Joshua.  Josh turned and looked at Papa, looked down at papa’s knee’s then his own and said “Who’s knee’s papa….mine or your’s?”

It was actually quite comically watching Papa search for the answer, it took him a moment for him to recover.  Of course he told Joshua it was his knees and we hoped that the corn would be at least that high by July 4th.  The weeks passed and every Saturday the boys would go out to check the progress of the corn.

A few days after the 4th of July when Joshua got back from his little get-away up north with Mio and Kaylee, the first thing he wanted to do was to check his corn.  He looked at me and said “Come on grandma, we’ve got to see if my corn is knee-high.”  So out the door he ran to the garden to check on his corn…..

Joshua’s Corn
Knee High By
The 4th Of July

Phew….knee high by the 4th of July.  Josh is so excited and checks his garden every time he is here.  We are all looking forward to enjoying his corn!

Everything in our garden’s (yes plural, we have two) are doing well, tomatoes, pepper plants, cucumbers and more.  I love having chives in garden, there is nothing better than going out and cutting them fresh from the garden for a recipe.

That’s what I did for today’s recipe which calls for fresh chives.  I was looking for a new sauce for ravioli, I wanted a white cream sauce, something quick and easy.  My search turned this one up on an internet search….it was on the Better Homes and Gardens website and it now joins the other two ravioli sauces as one of our favorites.

What I really like about this recipe is that it gives you options to choose from a variety of cheese and herbs.  My choices made a delicious sauce.  I used fresh parsley and chives, the cheese I picked was Asiago.

Creamy Vino Sauce

Creamy Vino Sauce

Makes: 6 servings
Serving size: 1/ cup sauce

Start to Finish: 20 mins

What You’ll Need

What You’ll Need

2   tablespoons finely chopped onion

2   cloves garlic, minced

2   tablespoons butter

1   tablespoon all-purpose flour

½  teaspoon salt

1/8  teaspoon ground black pepper

1 1/4cups whipping cream

½ cup dry white wine

½ cup shredded or crumbled Pecorino Romano, Parmesan, Asiago, Gorgonzola, and/or provolone cheese

2 tablespoons snipped fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley

2 tablespoons snipped fresh basil or chives or 1 tablespoon snipped fresh sage, thyme, oregano, or rosemary

1 lb bag Ravioli

Directions

In a medium saucepan, cook onion and garlic in hot butter over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

Onions and garlic

Stir in flour, salt, and pepper.

Add flour, salt and pepper

Add cream and wine all at once.

Add wine and cream at the same time

Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly.

Cook and stir until thick and bubbly

Add cheese.

Add cheese – stir until blended

 

Cook and stir for 1 minute more.

Stir in chives and parsley.

Stir in chives and parsley
(Or your choices)

 

Serve over cooked ravioli

 

Ravioli WIth Creamy Vino Sauce

 

 

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2 thoughts on “How Does Your Garden Grow?

  1. Yum. Anything to do with pasta makes me hungry!

    We’re having our fence replaced today; I’m keeping everything crossed that my redcurrant bushes and nasturtium plants don’t get squished – and I’ll murder anyone who accidentally kills my one successful romanesco!

    • Hi Missus!! Thanks for stopping by. I competely agree, I love pasta too…lol in an alternate universe I am Italian! I hope all goes well with the fence install, I know that I hold my breath when anyone or any thing comes close to my garden babies!!

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